Luke 10: 25-37

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Luke 10: 25-37

A young man in Congo approached our cooperative this week for help. He never attended school. He had no home, no food, and no money. Mama Aroyo told me "when he knocked on the door of our shop it was as if Christ himself came begging." She and the other women of our cooperative welcomed him in and offered to teach him some basic sewing skills. He is now a part of our community. Everyday, he has a group of joyful young ladies who talk with him, teach him, laugh with him, and care for him. And I think to myself: Who am I that God has put these women in my life? See how easy they love and serve others when they themselves live in poverty. My heart is full. 

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Give HOPE

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Give HOPE

"Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness." 

Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Africa is as unpredictable as ever. It's my 5th time (4th to DRC) and being among extreme poverty this month, I actually feel a bit defeated. Our cooperative is wonderful in many ways though still there is room to grow as far as bookkeeping and inventory tracking are concerned, but when I look around it's all so gloom...malaria, illness, death, starvation, roadside killings, and hardly any employment opportunities. Several times a day, individuals, who know about our cooperative, and want me to help them find a good job or tell them how to create a social enterprise, approach me. It's inspiring but at the same time I feel so overwhelmed.

My trip this summer challenged me greatly. Everyday in Congo I encountered young men and women from our village asking for assistance. They want to start a business or improve their current trade by taking our business training. Yet they also need computers to open Internet cafes, generators to increase production at the local bakery, and science books for medical students. The list is endless, and I've often found myself in the position of being the only one they can ask.  

Among many questions, I continue to ask myself how do we fit into all this? Where do we begin? And, will it ever be enough? When we start to see ourselves as the answer to the sufferings of others, we lose sight of authentic, human development. Development is not exclusive to improving the economic plight of the poor, though it is certainly one aspect, but rather we are called to something greater.

We are called to purposeful and fruitful relationships. I have learned one of the best ways we can do this is to simply begin with what we know - our talents. We acknowledge and embrace them not for our own benefit but for the good of others. When we do this, our capacity to impact those we love grows and we are inspired to give with joy. Our gifts will be constantly manifested and emboldened through our relationships, and so long as we have one another, there will always be hope. 

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SMALL ACTS TRANSFORM THE WORLD

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SMALL ACTS TRANSFORM THE WORLD

"Eduction is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to the next."

G.K. Chesterton

While many of our dreams have become a reality, our work in Congo has only just begun. It’s time we connect more Congolese artisans and entrepreneurs to global consumers so that families and communities everywhere can thrive. The next generation has a great opportunity to spread positive social change. Just take a look at the awesome impact made by the kids from East Cooper Montessori in South Carolina.

Every year, the Montessori Model UN (MMUN) invites students from across the country to participate in simulations at UN Headquarters in NYC. Students come to learn and exercise public speaking, debating, critical thinking, teamwork, and leadership skills.

Students are then assigned to represent the identity and interests of different nations. They come together to address and solve issues regarding peace and security, human rights, the rights of the child, child labor, the environment, food and hunger, economic development and globalization. The ultimate purpose of MMUN is to inspire youth to create a better world. And the kids from East Cooper Montessori did just that.

These young professionals wore their artisan made products throughout the UN halls and meeting rooms that week. As we continue to connect Congolese artisans and their handmade products to consumers in the U.S., our mission grows to impact the next generation of change-makers because not only did these young students discuss issues of health, security, and literacy that week, they provided it! 

Thank You East Cooper Montessori!!

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Girl Rising

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Girl Rising

Dieu Beni was a curious young twelve-year-old when we first met. She was sent to live within our volunteer compound, which was near her school. Dieu Beni's father is an English teacher. She picked up the language at home and with a little encouragement would often practice with me during the day. 

Dieu Beni watched volunteers come and go from our projects in the village. She peered in through our windows while we prepared evening meals and we would often find her eavesdropping on our daily conversations. She was also very helpful, especially with new volunteers who didn't know how to burn trash, cut firewood, or prepare chicken. 

In February, Dieu Beni came up to me and said that one day she was going to become a cooperative member of Totonga Bomoi. I smiled and told her that she had to study hard in school and complete her sewing studies, but inside I was completely filled with joy that this young girl, whom we often referred to as notre petit espion (our little spy), would one day become such an intelligent and determined young woman. 

Dieu Beni is like so many others in the village who, after years of walking miles to school and studying by candlelight, are left to a life of constant poverty. Malnourishment and disease take so many lives that our families in Congo live with constant fear of loss and unpredictability. 

By creating opportunities for our artisans to increase their monthly income and build community, we can strengthen families and communities across Congo. 

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